large canvas art

Whenever Jennifer and Dick Lanne moved into their 1782 Colonial house in Ballston Spa, New York, this structure, which is now Dick’s blacksmith workshop, was already on the property. “It was leaning over considerably, so we taken it back

to degree with a tractor and railroad jacks and married in the framing in the back and set it back again down, ” he explains.

The exterior color are available on all the barns and the house on the Lannes’ property. “We chose this color because we wanted to make everything look organic, like it grew there, ” Dick says. The paint color by Benjamin Moore is aptly

named Olive Branch and the lighter green on the fence and shutters is Bronze Green from Pittsburgh Chemicals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Making tools and working with his hands is a way of life for Dick Lanne, a practical blacksmith who has spent his life learning and perfecting this ability. “I had forging iron watching my first scoutmaster, Nick Schaper, with his

forge at a searching function, ” Lanne says. “He made a profound impression on me, not only as a scoutmaster, but that he will make anything he needed for his small farm from a door hinge or a knife or various tools he needed for

woodworking. Most everything he or she did was with hands tools, nothing electric or modern, something I emulate today. ”

 

 

 

Schaper wasn’t Lanne’s only mentor. He or she also learned a great deal from his father. “I learned to set and sharpen crosscut saws from my dad, with who I spent a great deal of time on the other conclusion of one. ”
Lanne is a practical blacksmith, which means he or she mostly repairs items and fabricates pieces they need around the house and barn. “My first scoutmaster mostly influenced me on dealing with tools, after watching him at his plantation mending

and making his own tools and tools, ” states Lanne, pictured in his workshop. “From there it was obviously a great deal of self-teaching, books and learning by hands on. ”

Lanne also demonstrates at Boy Scout events and period re-enactments. “It’s important for me to complete on skills I’ve learned, as times change and knowledge that isn’t a part of every day dissipates and dies away with the old-timers. I

have read many publications on forgotten large canvas art, but there is nothing like hands-on learning, ” Lanne says.
Pictured above are the tools Lanne has collected and repaired or has made through the years. Some were in his family, some were given to him, some were bought. He even has made a few tools with branches from the lilac bushes on the

property.
“They all have a different purpose, for hammering, trimming and shaping, ” Lanne says.